4 Useful Websites To Help You Pronounce Names Correctly

As a blogger I have to answer many questions to readers from across the world. Luckily, I converse with them either via emails

Lock Your Computer With Secure My Screen

There are several tools and methods to protect a computer from unauthorized access under a working environment. I had mentioned many of them in previous posts.

Create Multiple Aliases with Outlook.com Account

Microsoft has launched the latest version of their webmail service called Outlook.com. The new webmail replaces the existing Hotmail and users can now create their new Outlook.com email address

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

5 Best Free Anti-Malware and Anti-Spyware Tools for Windows 8.1

We all know that there are hundreds of viruses, malwares, spywares and other Trojans waiting on the Internet to attack your PC and steal information. So in such a situation, you need a good security tool which provides you protection against these threats. Recently we covered the best free anti-virus tools for Windows, but anti-virus tools does not provide complete protection against malwares and spywares.
So to keep your Windows protected, you need to buy an all-one-one security tool or use multiple free ones. So if you are already using an anti-virus, you can also consider installing one of the free anti-malware and anti-spyware tools to get extra protection for your PC.
These free tools provides you with protection against malwares including worms, Trojans, rootkits, rogues, dialers, spyware and more.

1. Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Free:

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Free utilizes powerful technology to detect and remove all traces of malware including worms, Trojans, rootkits, rogues, dialers, spyware and more. The app works on both 32 bit and 64 bit versions and has very good detection rates. It is also lightweight and easy to use.
Malwarebytes
2. SuperAntiSpyware:
SuperAntiSpyware can detect and clean Spyware, Adware and Remove Malware, Trojans, Dialers, Worms, KeyLoggers, HiJackers, Parasites, Rootkits, Rogue Security Products and many other types of threats. It is light on system resources and designed not to slow down your computer like many other anti-spyware products.
Superantispyware

3. Emsisoft Anti Malware:

If you unintentionally try to access a website that spreads trojans or spyware, Emsisoft Anti-Malware will prevent you from doing so. The built-in list of known dangerous and fraudulent websites is automatically updated every hour. This crucial layer of protection checks all files that are downloaded or run against more than 10 million signatures of known malicious software. The Emsisoft Anti-Malware File Guard is intelligent and self-optimizes continually, so you won’t feel the impact of dozens of files being scanned in the background every second.
Emsisoft Anti Malware

4. Spybot – Search and Destroy:

Spybot – Search and Destroy finds and destroys spyware, malware, adware and other malicious software. The program is free for private use. It has the ability to scan and remove malware and rootkits from your system and also protect your PC by immunizing your browser and hosts. If you need more protection, there is also paid home version as well as pro version.
Spybot2

5. Ad-Aware Free Antivirus+:

Ad-Aware Free Antivirus+ combines our legendary Anti-spyware with a super fast, free Antivirus. It now features download protection (blocks malicious files before being written to disk), sandboxing (keeps unknown apps running in a virtual environment) and advanced detection.
ad-aware

Sunday, December 14, 2014

How to Easily Take Ownership of Any File or Folder on Windows

If you have to work in a shared system environment you might be aware of the fact that taking ownership of a file or a folder on Windows can be a complicated chore. Even the seemingly simple task of adding URLs to a Windows Host file requires the user to become an owner of the file by going into the file security settings and acquiring full access permissions to work on it. Having so many steps to complete, even when you have an admin account can be a bit frustrating.
Put the tug-of-war with your computer behind you.
Image by Sergey Rusakov via Shutterstock.
If it’s just one file, making a change might not be too time consuming, but if you do this on a regular basis, then use this simple tool called TakeOwnershipPro to easily deal with file ownership issues.

TakeOwnershipPro for Windows

TakeOwnershipPro is a free, lightweight program that makes the process of gaining file ownership take not more than a mouse click. To get started, you can download the setup file and install it on your system. The installer is clean, with no third-party apps attached, so you can simply follow the onscreen instructions to complete the installation.
Now if you need to take ownership of any folder, launch TakeOwnershipPro, click the Add button to choose the folder or file of which you want to take ownership, or simply drag and drop the file from Windows Explorer.
TakeOwnershipPro
Now all you need to do is click Take Ownership and wait for the tool to do its magic. Don’t forget to check the option Include subfolders and files if you wish to take ownership of everything that’s in the folder you selected.
The tool also adds itself to the Windows right-click context menu, so you can simply right click on a file or a folder to take ownership. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, click Yesto allow TakeOwnershipPro to run and make changes.
context menu

How the Tool Works

The tool simply automates the task of taking ownership of a file through its folder security settings, but most everyday Windows users are unaware of what this means. TakeOwnershipPro adds ‘Everyone’ as an owner and gives full control of that particular folder to the user.
remove everyone from security settings
If you wish to delete the complete ownership of the file, all you have to do is go into theAdvanced Security Settings and delete the Everyone permission that has been added by TakeOwnershipPro

Conclusion

That was how you can easily take ownership of any file or folder. The app works on Windows 7 and above and is free to use without any limitations. So next time you get a message from Windows saying you don’t have permission to access a particular file or folder, all you need to do is use TakeOwnershipPro and show Windows who’s boss.


Thursday, December 11, 2014

Fix “This device can’t use a Trusted Platform Module” When Enabling BitLocker

I recently tried to enable BitLocker on an old Windows 8.1 PC at home and got an error message that I found would be extremely cryptic to anyone who isn’t a computer geek. Here was the message:
This device can’t use a Trusted Platform Module. Your administrator must select the “Allow BitLocker without a compatible TPM” option in the “Require additional authentication at startup” policy for OS volumes.
Say what!? Most people will probably just cancel the operation and forget about the whole thing with a message like that. Unfortunately, Microsoft never makes error messages clear and simple to understand. Let’s break it down.
bitlocker error
1. Trusted Platform Module (TPM) - This is basically a chip that in on newer processors that has extra security features. When BitLocker uses TPM, it stores the encryption key on the chip itself. If you don’t have a chip that supports TPM, then you can still use BitLocker, but you’ll have to store the encryption key on a USB stick.
2. Administrator Policy –  So what’s all the stuff about selecting X and Y policy for OS volumes? Basically, it’s a group policy setting that has to be changed that will allow BitLocker to work without the TPM requirement.
The fix is pretty straight-forward, just follow the instructions and don’t make any other changes.
Step 1- Open the group policy editor by pressing the Windows Key + R or by opening the charms bar in Windows 8 and typing in Run. In the Run dialog box, go ahead and type in gpedit.msc and press Enter.
gpedit msc
Now expand to the following section under group policy:
Computer Configuration – Administrative Templates – Windows Components – BitLocker Drive Encryption – Operating System Drives
On the right-hand side, you will see an option called Require additional authentication at startup. Go ahead and double-click on that option.
additional authentication startup
By default, it is set to Not Configured, so you’ll have to click on the Enabled radio button.  Automatically, it should check the Allow BitLocker without a compatible TPM box, but if not, make sure to check it.
bitlocker without tpm
Click OK and then close out group policy. Now go back to the BitLocker screen and click the Turn on BitLocker link.
turn on bitlocker
Now instead of getting an error message, you should see the BitLocker setup screen. When you click Next, it’ll start setting up your hard drive for BitLocker.
bitlocker setup
Again, there is no real security disadvantage to using BitLocker without a TPM, it’s just that the encryption key has to be stored on a USB drive instead of being stored on the chip itself. If you’re still having issues enabling BitLocker on Windows 8 or Windows 8.1, post a comment and let us know. Enjoy!